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THE RULES OF BEEP BASEBALL  
2005

Jim Wolfe  
NBBA Board of Directors  
Rules Committee Chairman

Last Modified: April, 7, 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

RULE 1 PLAYERS, FIELD, PLAYING EQUIPMENT  
    Section 1: Positions, Equipment, and Players  
    Section 2: The Field  
    Section 3: Equipment  
    Section 4: Defective Field and Player Equipment, Non-Regulation Facility, Malfunctioning Equipment  
RULE 2: PLAYING TERMS AND DEFINITIONS  
    Section 1: Ball, Passed Ball, Dead Ball, Ball in Flight, Bases  
    Section 2: Batter, Batter’s Box, B1, B2,...  
    Section 3: Catch, Catcher, Catcher’s Box  
    Section 4: Charged Conferences  
    Section 5: Error, Interference, Obstruction  
    Section 6: Fielder, Battery, F1, F2,..., Spotter  
    Section 7: Game, Called Game, Tie Game, Inning, Half Inning, Forfeit  
    Section 8: Hit, Fair Hit, Foul, Foul Tip, Bunt, Ground Ball, Fly Ball, No Pitch  
    Section 9: Pitcher, Pitch, Pivot Foot  
    Section 10: Penalty  
    Section 11: Play, Play Ruling, Appeal  
    Section 12: Putout, Strike Out  
    Section 13: Run, Batter/Runner  
    Section 14: Designated Hitter  
    Section 15: Speed-Up Rules  
    Section 16: Team and Player Abbreviations  
    Section 17: Time, Time At Bat  
RULE 3 SUBSTITUTING, COACHING, BENCH AND FIELD CONDUCT, CHARGED CONFERENCES  
    Section 1: Substituting  
    Section 2: Coaching  
    Section 3: Bench, Field and Spectator Conduct  
    Section 4: Charged Conferences  
RULE 4 STARTING AND ENDING A GAME  
    Section 1: Starting a Game  
    Section 2: Ending a Regulation Game  
    Section 3: Called Game  
    Section 4: Forfeited Game  
    Section 5: Protested Game  
RULE 5 DEAD BALL-SUSPENSION OF PLAY  
    Section 1: Dead Ball  
    Section 2: Suspension of Play  
RULE 6 PITCHING  
    Section 1: Pitching Regulations  
    Section 2: Infractions By Pitcher  
RULE 7 BATTING  
    Section 1: Position and Batting Order  
    Section 2: Strikes, Balls and Hits  
    Section 3: Batting Infractions  
    Section 4: Batter Is Out As In Above or When:  
RULE 8 BASE RUNNING  
    Section 1: When Batter Becomes a Runner  
    Section 2: Touching and Return To A Base  
    Section 3: Base Running Awards  
    Section 4: Runner Is Out  
RULE 9 SCORING AND RECORD-KEEPING  
RULE 10 UMPIRING  
    Section 1: General  
    Section 2: Head Umpire  
    Section 3: Field Umpire  
    Section 4: Protest Procedure  

RULE 1 PLAYERS, FIELD, PLAYING EQUIPMENT

Section 1: Positions, Equipment, and Players

Article 1...In Beep Baseball, each of the two teams is permitted six turns at bat during which it attempts to score runs by having its batters hit the beeping ball into fair territory and reach a buzzing (activated) base before the ball is legally fielded by the defense. The team in the field attempts to end the turn at bat of the opponent by causing three of its batters to be put out. Each of the two teams consists of at least six batters/fielders throughout the game (except as noted elsewhere in these rules), at least one but no more than two of whom must be designated Captain. The captain and the coach represent the team in all communication with the umpires and other game or tournament officials.

The captain’s duties can include: providing the head umpire with the name, shirt number, position, and batting order of each starting player; and informing all players of his team as to special ground rules as announced by the head umpire. Each team must also furnish its own pitchers and catchers on offense and at least one, but not more than two, spotters on defense. It shall be a forfeit if a team cannot provide these support personnel.

Article 2...A Player is designated on the official line-up sheet by his fielding position, name, and shirt number.

Article 3...All Players in a team’s line-up shall be visually impaired.

EXCEPTION:

[a] Each team is allowed to have normally sighted persons on their official player roster, and when they are blindfolded, they are eligible to play as fielder/batter; HOWEVER, no more than two fully sighted persons may participate as fielder/batter on any team at one time during any one game, and ONLY if no visually impaired player is available to play; [b] Pitcher and catcher should be normally sighted or have good visual acuity with corrective eyewear.

Article 4...at the time of the pitch, all defensive players, including the spotters, shall have both feet in fair territory, and shall be at lest forty feet from home plate.

Article 5...An active player may change to a different fielding position at any time without notifying the head umpire.

Article 6...Uniforms are recommended for all players.

[a] Uniforms of all team members should be the same color and style. Caps are recommended and shoes are required equipment (no track spikes are allowed). Metal cleats are prohibited. For individual players, sleeve lengths may vary. However, sleeves of each individual player shall be approximately the same length and shall not be ragged, frayed, nor slit. A uniform shall not have any dangerous buttons, pins, or ornaments. Each player shall be numbered on the back of the shirt with a plain number of a solid color contrasting with the color of the shirt. The number shall be at least eight inches high and no players on the same team shall wear identical numbers;

[b] It is mandatory for each batter and fielder to wear a blindfold. The on-deck batter shall have the blindfold in place and properly adjusted before entering the on-deck circle or area, and shall leave it in place until being put out, striking out, or scoring, unless permission to lower it is given by the umpire. Each fielder is required to have the blindfold in place and properly adjusted before assuming initial position on the field. If the head umpire has given permission to enter and leave the field with blindfolds down, fielder must face away from home plate and adjust blindfold before turning to face home plate after reaching initial position on the field and prior to the first pitch, legal or illegal, to the next batter. Fielders shall leave blindfold in place until the batting team has been retired and defense has left the field, unless otherwise instructed by the head umpire. The USABA and Sioux Falls blindfolds will be recognized as the minimum standard blindfold. Homemade equipment must meet these standards and be accepted by the head umpire and both team captains and coaches before being used; coach or capital should request this approval prior to the start of each game. Each blindfold shall have firm elastic bands that do not droop and shall be worn in such a manner as to completely prohibit any possible use of vision. [Note: These blindfolds are designed to be worn with the upper elastic band over the top of the ear and the lower band below the ear to insure a firm, close fit at all points of contact with the face]. The umpire has the right to inspect the mask of any player at any time; if the umpire determines that the mask is not being correctly worn he may issue a team warning to that team that the next player found to be wearing a mask improperly or wearing a mask that does not meet minimum specifications may be ejected from the game;

[c] Protective equipment of the type approved for use in baseball or softball is allowed and encouraged for any player on any team;

[d] Loose equipment of either team may not be on or near the field;

[e] All splints, casts, and braces must be padded. No protective equipment shall have exposed metal or any other hard material. Prostheses may be worn. Any equipment which has exposed metal or other hard surface must be examined by the head umpire prior to the game to evaluate the potential for danger. Any equipment, including prostheses, judged by the head umpire to be potentially dangerous is illegal and will not be allowed;

[f] Prior to the start of the game, the coach and/or captain(s) of each team shall be responsible for verifying to the head umpire that all that team’s players are equipped in compliance with these rules. Any questions regarding legality of a player’s equipment shall be determined by the head umpire and/or tournament offices;\

[g] Non-traditional playing equipment must be reviewed by the National Board of Directors for Beep Baseball before it will be permitted;

[h] Jewelry is prohibited with the exception of medical alert bracelets or necklaces. If a player must wear a medical alert bracelet/necklace, it should be taped to the body so as to remain visible but not present a possible hazard.

Section 2: The Field

Article 1...The Playing Field shall be a right angle having sides of at least 100 feet, with their point of origin being the rear point of home plate. All lines of the playing field shall be marked with a material that is not injurious to the eyes or skin. Distance from the rear point of home plate to the nearest obstruction on fair ground should be at least 180 feet down the foul lines and through the center of the field. Foul lines shall be marked to extend from the rear point of home plate toward first and third base marks for a distance of at least 100 feet. It is recommended that these lines extend at least thirty [30] feet beyond the ninety foot mark. A line ten feet in length shall be drawn at a right angle from the 100 foot mark (hereafter referred to as the spot) of each of the foul lines. The near edge of first and third base shall be placed at the end of these ten foot lines. The distance between first and third bases shall be no less than 141'3" and no more than 141'6" measured spot-to-spot, and not less than 141'4" or 141'6" measured from the near edge of either base, or its wind-resistance device, to the near edge of the other base, or its wind-resistance device.

Article 2...An additional Foul Line shall be marked at a poing beginning 40 feet down the first base line from the rear point of home plate and extending across the field to a point 40 feet down the third base line from the rear point of home plate. This foul line shall also be forty feet from the rear point of home plate through the center of the field. The distance between the 40 foot marks on each baseline shall be no less than 56'3" and no more than 56'6".

Article 3...A Pitcher’s Mark shall be placed on the field of play a distance of 21'5" from the rear point of home plate. The pitcher’s mark shall be no longer than 30" in length and shall be center between the first and third base foul lines.

Article 4...A Batter’s Box, if used, shall be drawn on both sides of home plate. The boxes shall be 4 feet deep measured from a point 6" away from the 8 ½" edge of home plate; and 8 feet long measuring 4 feet from the back point of the 8 ½" edge of home plate toward the pitcher’s mark and 4 feet from the same point toward the catcher.

Section 3: Equipment

Article 1...First and Third base shall meet the following requirements:

A. Height- 48" minimum, 54" maximum

B. Diameter- 8" minimum, 10" maximum

C. Shape- A cylinder, square, or cone from top to bottom. (Exception: see I, Wind-resistance devices)

D. Weight- Five pounds maximum

E. Covering- Vinyl (1st choice), Canvas (2nd choice)

F. Sound Device Location; Centered no less than 34" and no more than 40" above ground level.

G. Sound Frequency (Pitch)- Variable

H. Sound Level (Loudness); Medium on an adjustable device.

I. Wind-Resistance Devices- Magnets, Velcro, or any other means accepted by the NBBA to hold base in an upright position.

Article 2...Home Plate (base) shall be a five-sided slab of whitened material. It shall be a 12" square with two of the corners filled in so that one edge is 17" long, two are 12", and two are 8 ½". It shall be set in/on the ground so that the two 12" edges coincide with the base lines extending from the rear point of home plate to first and third base spots with the 17" edge facing the pitcher’s mark.

Article 3...The Ball shall be a “softball” weighing approximately 16 ounces, 16 inches in circumference, with a hollow core containing a sound emitting device and a rechargeable power supply. The ball shall be spherical in shape, white, of solid construction, and shall fly and roll true. The ball shall be designed in such a way that the sound emitting device can be switched on and off. The NBBA Board of Directors, or its appointed representative, shall be the sole judge if any ball design is acceptable for use in NBBA sanctioned games or tournaments.

Article 4...The Bat shall meet minimum ASA, USSSA, National Federation of NCAA slow-pitch softball standards. There shall be no devices, attachments or wrappings that cause the handle to become flush with the know. Only bats may be used for loosening up (including weighted bats for this purpose) at any location. Devices designed to remain part of the bat, such as batting donuts and wind resistant devices, are legal for warming up only. It is mandatory that the knobs on aluminum or magnesium bats be securely fastened. The aluminum or magnesium bats must have a sound deadening material inside. Aluminum or magnesium bats must have a safety grip of cork, non-slip tape, or composition material. The grip must extend a minimum of 10" but not more than 18" from the handle end of the bat. Slippery tape or similar material shall be prohibited. A wooden bat may be roughened or wound with tape or twine not more than 18" from the handle end of the bat. No foreign substance may be added to the bat beyond 18" from the end of the handle. Each bat shall be:

A. Diameter at thickest part- 2 3/4" or less

B. Length- 36" or less

C. Weight- 38 ounces or less Bats that do not meet these specifications are illegal.

Article 5...Leather gloves or mitts may be worn by any fielder. There is no distinction between a glove and a mitt. The glove/mitt worn by all fields shall conform to the following specifications:

A. Height- (measured from the bottom edge or heel straight up across the center of the palm to a line even with the highest point of the glove/mitt): 14"

B. Width of palm (measured from the bottom edge of the webbing farthest from the thumb in a horizontal line to the outside of the little finger edge of the glove/mitt): 8"

C. Webbing- (measured across the top end along any line parallel to the top): 5 3/4"

Section 4: Defective Field and Player Equipment, Non-Regulation Facility, Malfunctioning Equipment

Article 1...Defective Equipment must be replaced or repaired immediately.

Article 2...Any game started on a Non-regulation Facility by mutual agreement of the opposing coaches and team captains shall not be protested for this reason.

Article 3...A ball which ceases to beep in the proper manner after it is hit and before it is fielded, shall be considered to have malfunctioned. A base which is noticeable late coming on or which is not properly placed so that the speaker is facing home plate, or which falls over or is blown over, or which fails to sound or ceases to sound prior to the end of the play shall be considered to have malfunctioned. In the case of Malfunctioning Equipment, this is a “delayed decision” and the Head Umpire shall allow the team at the disadvantage to attempt to complete the play before calling a replay. If the team at the disadvantage can successfully complete the play, the Head Umpire may allow the play to stand. EXAMPLE: Legally fielding a malfunctioning ball prior to runner legally touching base; or legally touching malfunctioning base prior to ball being legally fielded. If the ball ceases to beep and does not pass the 40 foot foul line, it is a foul ball. A foul ball which ceases to beep in the proper manner will be called a strike unless it is the fourth strike, in which case the batter will resume with ball and strike count as it was prior to the foul ball, the fourth strike must be a clean miss or a called strike.

A. A ball will be replaced at the request of a player at the completion of an at-bat or inning, or at any time by the umpire in the case of an obvious malfunction.

RULE 2: PLAYING TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

Section 1: Ball, Passed Ball, Dead Ball, Ball in Flight, Bases

Article 1...The Ball is one of the playing implements. It emits an intermittent “beep” when activated.

Article 2...The term “Passed Ball”, or “Pass”, is used to designate a pitch which is not swung at by the batter. A batter is allowed one passed ball without penalty. Additional passed balls will be called strikes.

Article 3...A Dead Ball is a ball which has ceased to function properly; or has been touched by a non-playing team member or spectator; or has been picked up by the umpire to be inspected; or is touched by or touches the pitcher after being hit by the batter and before it has crossed the forty-foot line.

Article 4...A batted ball is in Flight until it has touched the ground or some object or person in fair or foul territory.

Article 5...The Bases are playing implements of the game. There shall be three bases: Home base (plate), 1st base, and 3rd base. First and third bases will emit a steady ‘buzz’ when activated, home plate does not emit a sound.

Section 2: Batter, Batter’s Box, B1, B2,...

Article 1...The Batter is the player of the team at bat who is entitled to occupy either of the two batter’s boxes located at home plate. The Batter’s Box is the 4' x 8' area near and on either side of home plate where the batter will stand with both his entire feet when batting, the lines are part of the box. When the head umpire calls “Play”, the batter has thirty seconds to occupy one of these boxes.

An “On-Deck Circle” for each team is a circle five feet in diameter located a safe distance to the side of and behind home plate where each batter will stand while awaiting his turn at bat. When the head umpire calls “Play”, the on-deck batter will have thirty seconds to occupy the on-deck circle. The batter-ondeck must have blindfold in place prior to entering the on-deck circle. The penalty for batter not being at the plate and/or on-deck batter not being ready in the circle within thirty seconds shall be a strike on the current batter; the penalty for the on-deck batter not having blindfold in place prior to entering the circle shall be a strike on the current batter. Once the batter-on-deck has the blindfold in place, it shall not be lowered or removed without permission from the umpire until that person has completed his turn at bat by scoring, striking out, or being put out: PENALTY- The batter or the batter-on-deck who removed the mask illegally shall be declared out. The Umpire may, at his discretion, issue one, but no more than two, team warnings for batter or batteron- deck violations of the mask rule before charging the penalty strike or declaring the batter or batter-on-deck out.

Article 2...The player who bates first in his half of an inning is designated B1, the second player to bat is B2,and so on through the inning.

Section 3: Catch, Catcher, Catcher’s Box

Article 1...A Catch is the act of a fielder in getting secure possession of the ball, in hand(s) or glove, above the ground, and away from the body. In the rare event that a defensive layer catches a live, batted fly ball in flight prior to the ball touching the ground, a spotter or umpire, or any object on fair or foul ground other than another defensive player this will automatically retire the side and the offensive team will immediately take the field.

Article 2...The Catcher is the person to whom the pitcher throws when delivering the ball to the batter. When ready to receive a pitch, the catcher must be in the area immediately behind home plate. This area shall be called the catcher’s box, and is entirely in foul territory.

Section 4: Charged Conferences

Article 1...Charged Conference is one which involves the coach or his non-playing representative, and a player or players of the team.

Section 5: Error, Interference, Obstruction

Article 1...An error is a misplay by a fielder or a team which is recorded in the error column of the player or team record.

Article 2...Interference and Obstruction

[a] Offensive Interference is any act by a member of the team at bat which interferes with, obstructs, hinders, impedes, or confuses any fielder attempting to make a play or a runner comes in contact with any fielder, with or without the ball, on or inside the baseline when the fielder is attempting to field the ball;

[b] It is Umpire Interference when he inadvertently moves so as to hinder a player’s attempt to field a batted ball or a runner’s attempt to reach the activated base, or is hit by a fair ball (page 22: No Pitch);

[c] Spectator Interference is any action by a spectator which impedes the progress of the game;

[d] Obstruction is any act by a member of the defensive team which interferes with, obstructs, hinders, impedes, or confuses a batter attempting to hit or a runner in his attempt to reach the activated base or fielder comes in contact with a runner outside the baseline, regardless of which base is activated (even if the runner is advancing to the wrong base);

Section 6: Fielder, Battery, F1, F2,..., Spotter

Article 1...A Fielder is any one of six players of a team when it is not at bat (defensive team). There is no specific distinction between outfield and infield positions in beep baseball. The terms “infield” and “outfield” are used in these rules to distinguish between positions 1, 3, and 5; and 2, 4, and 6 respectively, although a team may place the players occupying these positions anywhere on the playing field. The pitcher and catcher are the Battery.

Article 2...In play rulings and discussion, the fielders are referred to as F1, F2, etc. F1 is infielder at first base, F3 is infielder at shortstop, F5 is infielder at third base, F2 is outfielder in right field, F4 is outfielder in center, F6 is outfielder in left field, P is pitcher (non-fielding position), C is catcher (non-fielding position), and Sp is spotter (also a non-fielding position).

Article 3...A Spotter is a non-playing member of the defensive team who will assist the defensive team in the field. Each team must have one, but not more than two, spotters. The spotter(s) will take a position on the field in fair territory prior to the Umpire calling “play”. The spotters may assist the defense in position themselves on the field prior to each pitch. Spotter may advise if a batter is right- or left-handed, male or female, or any additional information which the spotter feels is necessary for the players to know, prior to the umpire calling “play” or prior to the Time of the Pitch for the first pitch, and subsequent pitches, to that batter. The spotter may use only the numbers one through six when designating which player is in the best position to field a batter ball. If the spotter attempts to convey any other information (such as left or right, in or out, a second call by the same or different spotter [double call], or any other verbal or physical assistance to aid a player or players in locating the ball) the umpire shall award the offensive team a run and caution both the captain and the spotter of that team; if repeated offenses are called for the same or similar infraction in that ball game, the spotter may be ejected from the game. Two ejections in a tournament will result in that spotter being barred from further participation in that tournament in any capacity. Defensive players are allowed to speak freely to aid one another in locating and fielding the ball.

EXCEPTIONS: Exceptions to the spotter ejection are:

[a] In the event a ball in flight presents a chance of injury to a defensive player, the spotter may call out a warning without penalty;

[b] If a collision between fielders is imminent, the spotter may , and should, call out a warning without penalty;

[c] If a collision between a fielder and the runner is imminent, the spotter may, and should, call out a warning. In this case the umpire shall decide if the play should be awarded to the defense, if the collision was/would have been in fair territory; or the offense, if the collision was/would have been in foul territory; or if the play will be redone with ball and strike count starting over;

[d] A spotter may knock down an unusually hard hit ball traveling toward a defensive player to protect the player. In this case, a run will be awarded to the offensive team.

NOTE: It must be stated here that a simultaneous or near-simultaneous call by two spotters is possible. The head umpire will be the sole judge of whether or not a simultaneous or nearsimultaneous call has occurred. The head umpire may confer with the other officials on the field before announcing a decision. This occurrence is not a double-call and shall not be penalized as such. If the head umpire decides the call was simultaneous, the play will stand; otherwise he may call a replay and the batter shall resume with ball and strike count starting over.

Section 7: Game, Called Game, Tie Game, Inning, Half Inning, Forfeit

Article 1...A Regulation Beep Baseball Game is six innings (turns at bat) for each team unless shortened as allowed for elsewhere in these rules, or unless extra innings are necessary to break a tie score. A Called Game is one which is ended by order of the umpire and/or tournament officials according to regulations printed elsewhere in these rules. A Suspended Game is a called game that will be completed at a later time.

Article 2...An Inning is that portion of the game which includes a turn at bat for each team. A Half Inning is the interval during which one team is on offense (batting) and the other is on defense (fielding). A half inning ends when there is a third out of when a fly ball is caught as in R2-s3-a1 or when, in the last inning, the winning run is scored. An Extra Inning is one which extends the game in an attempt to break a tie score. If it is necessary to end the game when the score is tied, it is a Tie Game.

Article 3...A Forfeited Game is one awarded to the opponent of the offending team.

Section 8: Hit, Fair Hit, Foul, Foul Tip, Bunt, Ground Ball, Fly Ball, No Pitch

Article 1...A Hit is the act of the batter initiating contact between the bat and the pitched ball. A Fair Hit (commonly called a fair ball) is a batted ball which settles on fair territory between home and first base spot or between home and third base spot, on or inside the base lines and on or beyond the forty-foot line; or contacts fair ground on or beyond the forty-foot line on or between first base line and third base line; or which is on or over fair ground when bounding to the outfield area beyond first or third base spot; or first falls on fair ground beyond first or third base spot; or which touches the person of a spotter, or fielder (other than the pitcher); or which, while on or over fair ground, passes out of the playing area. [Note: a fly or line drive hit which passes over or inside first or third base spot in flight and curves to foul ground beyond such spot before touching or being touched is not a fair hit, it is a foul ball.]

Article 2...A Foul is a batted ball which settles on foul territory between home and first base spot or between home and third base spot before or after crossing the forty-foot line and before it has passed either base spot in fair territory and before it hs been touched by a defensive fielder; or that bounds past first or third base spot on or over foul territory; or that first falls on foul ground beyond first or third base spot prior to touching or being touched in fair territory; or that stays between first and third baselines but stops moving before it has reached the forty-foot foul line; or that, after touching the ground beyond the forty-foot foul line, rebounds, bounces, or rolls, back across the forty-foot foul line into foul territory before touching or being touched by a fielder; or that, while on or over foul territory, touches the person of an umpire or other official or a player or other person, or any object foreign to the natural ground, including a base or its wind-resistant device. A Foul Tip is a batted ball that goes directly to the catcher’s hands and is legally caught and held by any fielder, a Foul Tip is a foul ball and the batter will remain at bat. The fourth strike must be a clean miss or a called strike.

Article 3...The Bunt is not allowed. For attempting to bunt the batter will be called out, even if the ball travels over the forty-foot line. The umpire should note and be aware of the difference between an obvious, conscious attempt to bunt and failure to “get a good piece of the ball”. Bunting seldom happens in Beep Baseball, this ruling is included for the “one time in a hundred” when it does happen.

Article 4...A Fly Ball is a batted ball which rises an appreciable height above the ground. A Line Drive is a batted fly ball which travels parallel or nearly so with the ground through most of its flight. A Ground Ball is one which is neither a fly nor a line drive.

Article 5...A No-Pitch is a batted ball which touches the pitcher or his clothing. The count to the batter shall remain the same as it was before that pitch. A no-pitch may also be called for spectator interference or late “ready” or other call by the spotter after or at the same time the pitcher has made the first of two required verbal signals to the batter. It may also be a no-pitch when an official is hit by a fair ball (pg. 42). For a no-pitch, the batter will resume with ball and strike count as it was before the no-pitch call.

Section 9: Pitcher, Pitch, Pivot Foot

Article 1...The Pitcher is the person designated in the score book as being responsible for delivering the ball to the batter. A live ball delivered to the batter is a Pitch. The term implies a legally delivered ball unless otherwise stated. Time of The Pitch is when the pitcher has committed himself to deliver the pitch to the batter. Commitment shall be defined as any motion by the pitcher customarily associated with his/her pitching style.

Article 2...The pitcher’s Pivot Foot is that foot which the pitcher contacts the pitching mark when he delivers the ball. Normally, for a left-handed pitcher it is the left foot; for a right-handed pitcher it is the right foot.

Article 3...An Illegal Pitch is a pitch which is delivered to the batter when the pitcher’s pivot foot is not in contact with the pitching mark or which is delivered to the batter in violation of the pitching rule. [see Rule 6, Sect. 2, Art. 3 for penalties.]

Section 10: Penalty

Article 1...A Penalty is the loss assessed by the umpire against a player, spotter, team or other person for a rule infraction. Penalties include, but are not limited to, ejecting or disqualifying the offending person; declaring batter or runner out; awarding run to batter/runner; charging batter with strike (for delay by batter, pitcher, or on-deck batter); forfeiting game (Umpire must suspend game and confer with tournament officials unless offense is of highly serious nature: i.e. physical threat or abuse toward umpire or players of opposing team, or repeated unsportsmanlike conduct or acts in Rule 4, Sect. 4, Art. 1 occur); or removing non-players from the bench, field or spectator area.

Section 11: Play, Play Ruling, Appeal

Article 1...”Play” is the order given by the umpire when it is time for the game to begin or to be resumed after having been suspended when he called “Time”. The term is also used to denote a unit of action which begins when the pitcher has the ball in his possession in pitching position and ends when the ball is no longer in play, or the pitcher again holds the ball while in pitching position.

Article 2...A Play Ruling is a statement of a play situation and the correct ruling. It is considered an integral part of the rules and applies to analogous situations.

Article 3...An Appeal is a situation where the umpire ignores a batting out of order infraction or illegal substitution unless his attention is called to it. Batting out of order must be appealed before the first pitch, legal or illegal, to the next batter. [Penalty: The out of order batter is declared out.] EXAMPLE: Batter two is due up but batter three bats instead. After B3 has completed his turn at bat, B2 comes to the plate; but before the first pitch, legal or illegal, to B2, the defense notifies the head umpire that a batter was out of order. Since batter two did not appear at the proper time, B2 is out and batter four is up. If B2 receives a legal or illegal pitch prior to the appeal, batting out of order is ignored and batter three will be the next batter up after batter two completes his turn at bat.

Section 12: Putout, Strike Out

Article 1...A Putout is the act of a fielder in retiring a batter/runner by legally fielding the ball before the runner has legally touched the activated base. An “out” is one of the three required retirements of the players of the team at bat.

Article 2...A Strike Out is the result of the batter having four strikes charged against him.

Section 13: Run, Batter/Runner

Article 1...A Run is the score made by a runner who legally advances to and touches the activated base before being put out by the defense.

Article 2...A Home Run is a ball that travels at least 180 feet in the air over fair territory. The Head Umpire or Field Umpire will declare a Home Run and the defense will cease attempts to field the ball. The runner will have thirty seconds to advance to and touch the activated base in order to record a score. The Malfunctioning Equipment rule does not apply to a Home Run; except, if neither base will function, the Head Umpire may award the run. If the runner fails to advance to and touch the activated base in thirty seconds or less, the runner will be declared out.

Article 3...The Batter/Runner is a player who has hit a pitched ball into fair or foul territory and is proceeding to the activated base and has not yet been put out or scored. Also referred to as runner.

Section 14: Designated Hitter

Article 1...The use of a Designated Hitter (DH) is not required but, if a team intends to use a DH. It must be announced to the Head Umpire (HU) prior to the start of the game. The DH and the Defensive Player (DP) for whom the DH is batting must be indicated by name and uniform number on the lineup sheet presented to the HU or Official Scorekeeper. Only one DH role may be used per game. If one team opts to use the DH, the opposing team is not required to do the same.

Article 2...The DH and the DP are “locked” in the lineup. The DP may be substituted for provided the active DH is not the replacement; the DH may be substituted for provided the active DP is not the replacement. If the active DH takes the field, the DP for whom the DH was batting must leave the game and the role of DH is terminated for the remainder of the game. If the active DP bats, the DH who was batting must leave the game and the role of DH is terminated for the remainder of the game. Article 3...the active DH may be substituted out and, after 6 outs (3 outs under 12-run rule) may re-enter the game as an eligible substitute for any player, including the DP or DH. The active DP may be substituted out and, after 6 outs (3 outs under 12-run rule) may re-enter the game as an eligible substitute for any player, including the DH or DP.

Article 4...If a team uses the DH but fails to notify the Head Umpire and/or Official Scorekeeper prior to the start of the game, the penalty for an ineligible player will be imposed and the role of DH will be terminated for the remainder of the game for that team.

Section 15: Speed-Up Rules

Article 1...Speed-up Rules may be adopted for any single game by mutual agreement of the coaches and captains of the opposing teams prior to the start of the game. Speed-up rules for any game or series of games in tournament play must be instituted by the tournament committee or tournament chairperson(s) prior to the start of the game(s) to be affected. All coaches and umpires for the affected games must be notified prior to the start of the first affected game.

Section 16: Team and Player Abbreviations

Article 1...For brevity in play rulings., the home team is “H” and the visiting team is “V”. Players of the team at bat are B1, B2, etc. Fielding players are F1, F2, etc. Substitutes are S1, S2, etc. Spotters are Sp1 and/or Sp2. Pitcher and catcher are P and C respectively.

Section 17: Time, Time At Bat

Article 1...”Time” is the command given by the umpire to suspend play. The ball becomes dead when it is given and no game action can occur, except for penalties or awards. The term is also used in recording the length of the game.

Article 2...Time At Bat is the period beginning when a batter first enters the batter’s box and continuing until he is put out, strikes out, or scores a run.

[a] A batter is not charged with a time at bat when he is replaced before being charged with three strikes or he is replaced after being charged with three strikes and his substitute does not strike out;

[b] When Illegal Substitution occurs as in Rule 3, Sect. 1, Art. 1, a time-at-bat will be charged for the replaced player for each time his illegal substitute batted.

Section 18: Touching Ball, Base, or Runner

Article 1...Touching is contact with, and there is no distinction between the act of touching and being touched by. For the runner touching the base, the term applies to contact with any part of the runner or his clothing (if the clothing is reasonably well-fitted) with any part of the base or its wind-resistant device. For battered ball touching batter, pitcher, or any other player or non-player; or bat touching ball a second time, the term applies to contact with any part of the person, object or clothing (if the clothing is reasonably well-fitted).

RULE 3 SUBSTITUTING, COACHING, BENCH AND FIELD CONDUCT, CHARGED CONFERENCES

Section 1: Substituting

Article 1...Unlimited substitution is permitted, subject to the conditions set forth in RULE 3. After the head umpire has received the official lineup card prior to the start of the game, the pitcher shall pitch to the first batter until the batter has been put out, strikes out, or scores a run (unless the pitcher is removed due to injury or ejection). In any other case, a substitute may replace a player of his team when the ball is dead and time out has been called or a half inning has been completed. The substitute or his coach or captain shall report to the head umpire prior to the next pitch by stating the substitute’s name, shirt number, the name of the player he is replacing in the batting order, and the position he will play in the field. A projected substitution shall not be reported to the head umpire prior to the actual change. If a player fails to report and enters the game, the player he replaced is considered to have remained in the game. Any play in which the illegal substitute earned a run on offense or made a putout on defense for his team shall have the play ruling reversed. The illegal substitute may also be removed from the game for six outs or until the end of the game, whichever comes first. The player he replaced will return to the game, unless the replaced player left the game because of injury. If the replaced player cannot return to the game, some other eligible player must replace him. If there are no more eligible replacements the team must play the game one player short, taking an automatic out whenever that spot in the batting order comes up, until a replacement becomes eligible or the game ends, whichever occurs first. SIX OUT PENALTY REMOVAL FOR ILLEGAL SUBSTITUTION APPLIES UNDER REGULAR OR TWELVE-RUN RULE. If enforcement of this article results in the affected team having less than five players to continue the game, the game shall be forfeited to the other team. [Rule 4, Sect. 4, Art.1-f,g] NOTE: The Head Umpire will ignore Illegal Substitution unless his attention is called to it by the opposing team through appeal as outlined in Rule 2, Sect. 1, Art. 3. The six out penalty for Illegal substitution will begin at the time the Illegal Substitution is reported to the umpire. Enforcement of the penalty for Illegal Substitution will not result in a team replaying any part of any previous inning, even if it causes more or less than three outs to be recorded in that previous inning. Since the replaced player is considered to have remained in the game, the result of any times at bat by the Illegal substitute will recorded on the replaced player’s record. [Rule 2, Sect.Aired.2-b]

Article 2...If a pitcher is replaced while his team is at bat, the replacement pitcher shall pitch to the batter then at bat until such batter has been retired or has scored a run.

Article 3...Once a player is removed due to injury, that player cannot return for the remainder of the game unless approved by the head umpire, or the tournament committee if in tournament play. Any player who is removed from a game due to a serious head injury or suspected broken bones or dislocations may not return without a signed release from a licensed physician permitting that player to participate in the remainder of the game or tournament.

Article 4...Once a player other than the pitcher or catcher has been replaced by a substitute, the two players involved must remain in or out of the game for the completion of six outs from the time of the substitution, or to the end of the game, whichever comes first; except as provided for in Article 1, or Article 6. If a substitution occurs prior to institution of the Twelve Run Rule, or after the Twelve Run Rule has been revoked, the players involved shall remain subject to this rule, EVEN IF THE TWELVE-RUN RULE IS INVOKED IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE SUBSTITUTION. The rule which applies is the rule in effect at the time the substitution is reported to the head umpire. (For substitution during the Twelve Run Rule, see Article 6.)

Article 5...TWELVE RUN RULE: If a team establishes a lead of twelve or more runs at the end of any full inning, the head umpire will inform both teams that the Twelve Run Rule is in effect. At this time, the trailing team will become the batting team and will remain at bat until they either tie the score, take the lead or use all of their remaining outs for the game. The outs remaining will be recorded in units of three (½ innings). If the trailing team should tie the score or take the lead, play will continue to the nearest full unit of three outs when the opposing team will come to bat and complete their half of each inning played until both teams have had an equal number of at bats; at this time the head umpire will check with the official scorekeeper to determine if the Twelve Run Rule should be revoked or continued in effect. If a team comes to bat under the Twelve Run Rule and fails to tie the score or take the lead after using all of their remaining outs for the game, the game ends.

Article 6...SUBSTITUTION UNDER THE TWELVE RUN RULE differs from substitution under the normal rule. When a substitution occurs under the Twelve Run Rule, the players involved must remain in/out of the game while three outs are recorded from the time of the substitution; or, until the end of the game, whichever comes first. If the Twelve Run Rule is revoked immediately after the substitution, the players involved will remain subject to this rule since it was the rule in effect at the time of the substitution.

Section 2: Coaching

Article 1...The coach may keep statistics on the opposing team and may communicate them to his team on defense prior to the time of the pitch for the first pitch to the current batter.

Article 2...A coach or any other person associated with a team may not assist a runner or a fielder by giving any verbal or physical assistance in locating the activated base or the ball (Exception: A team’s legal spotters). If such assistance is noted by an umpire, the offended team will be awarded a run or an out.

Article 3...Any person not a batter/runner or one of the six defensive players in the field, shall not fail to vacate any area needed by a runner or fielder attempting to reach a base or field a batted ball. This shall apply to a runner going to the wrong base, a malfunctioning base, the correct base; or a fielder trying for a live ball, foul ball, malfunctioning ball, going toward the ball or away from it in the attempt to field the ball. For failure to vacate, the offended team shall be awarded an out or a run subject t Rule 2, Sect. 5, Art. 2a-b-c-d.

Section 3: Bench, Field and Spectator Conduct

Article 1...A coach, player, substitute, attendant, spotter, other team personnel, or spectators shall not:

[a] Carelessly throw a bat; or

[b] Deliberately throw a bat or equipment; or

[c] Call “Time” or use any command or commit any act for the purpose of trying to confuse the batter or fielders or disrupt the rhythm of the pitcher; or

[d] Use word or act to incite or try to incite spectators to demonstrations, or use profanity or remarks which reflect upon opposing player, umpire or spectator; or

[e] Remain in the area behind the catcher within a distance of twenty- five feet while the pitcher and catcher are in their legal positions; or

[f] Use amplifiers or bullhorns from the bench, spectator area, or on the field during the course of the game; or

[g] Maliciously approach or contact a player, bench personnel, a spotter, an umpire, or other game official; or

[h] Be outside the vicinity of the designated bench area if not a batter, ondeck batter, in the coaches area, spotter, battery, or one of the six players on defense; or

[i] Verbalize in any way with the opposing team for the purpose for intimidation; or

[j] Exhibit behavior that is not in accordance with the spirit of fair play; or

[k] Charge an umpire; or

[l] Players in the game shall not wear jewelry (safety hazard).

EXPECTION: Medical Alert bracelets or necklaces. (This rule is not heavily enforced expect for rings, earrings, and watches.)

PENALTY: In (a) and (l) the umpire shall issue a warning to the coach of the team involved which will result in the next offender being ejected. In (b), (g), and (k), umpire shall eject the offender from the game. Failure to comply shall result in game being forfeited. However, in (c), (d), (e), (f), (h), (i), and (j) if the offense is judged to be of a minor nature, the Umpire may warn the offender and then eject him if he repeats the offense. Also, in (c) and (g), an ejected player may be declared out if on offense and run scored if on defense.

Article 2...Any player, coach, spotter, or bench personnel removed from the game by the umpire for disciplinary reasons may not reenter that game under any circumstance and , in tournament play, is barred from participating in the next game for that team or any other team present at the tournament. Two ejections in a series or tournament will result in the individual being barred from further participation of any kind, other than as a spectator, for the remainder of the series or tournament.

Section 4: Charged Conferences

Article 1...Each team, when on defense, may be granted not more than four (4) Charged Conferences during a six-inning game without penalty, to permit a coach or his non-playing representative to confer with a defensive player or players. In any extra-inning game, each team shall be permitted one (1) charged conference each inning on defense without penalty. The number of charged conferences in not cumulative. A request for time for this purpose may be made by a coach, player, substitute, or attendant. Time granted for an obviously incapacitated player shall not constitute a charged conference. For a defensive charged conference in excess of four in a six-inning game or in excess of one in each extra-inning, the current batter shall be awarded a “free” pitch (one strike deducted from current count).

Article 2...Each team, when on offense, may be granted not more than two Charged Conferences per inning to permit a coach or any of that team’s personnel to confer with the batter. The Umpire shall deny any subsequent requests for time for this purpose.

RULE 4 STARTING AND ENDING A GAME

Section 1: Starting a Game

Article 1...The Home Team coach or a tournament official charged with that duty of the Head Umpire shall decide if the grounds and other conditions are suitable for starting the game. After the game has started, the Umpire and other game officials are sole judges as to whether conditions are fit for continued play, or whether conditions are suitable for starting a second game on that field in a double-header or tournament series.

Article 2...If there are unusual conditions, such as spectators or obstacles on or too near the playing field, the home team coach or tournament officials shall propose special Ground Rules. If sanctioned by the Visiting Team, these rules shall be in effect for the duration of that game and subsequent games played on that field on the same day with the same teams. If the teams cannot agree, the Umpire(s) and other game of tournament officials shall formulate ground rules. All special rules shall be announced.

Article 3...Before Game Time, the home team and the visiting team shall deliver their respective batting orders in duplicate to the Head Umpire. The head umpire shall then permit inspection by both captains and/or coaches. At this time, the regulations governing substitution (Rule 3) shall go into effect.

Article 4...The Visiting team shall be the first to take its turn at bat. On a neutral field or by agreement, either team may be designated as Home team.

Article 5...The Game begins when the Umpire calls “Play” at the scheduled game time.

Section 2: Ending a Regulation Game

Article 1...A Regulation Game consists of six innings (turns at bat) for each team, unless extra innings are necessary because of a tie score; or unless shortened due to time limit, inclement weather, darkness on an unlighted field, or because the home team needs less than its complete half-inning at the bottom of the last inning of play. Each team must have six blindfolded players in its line-up throughout the game, plus a pitcher, catcher, and at least one spotter, otherwise the game may be forfeited (see EXCEPTION Rule 4, Sect. 4, Art. 1-f). A forfeited game is regulation, regardless of the number of innings played

Article 2...The Game ends when the team behind in score has completed its turn at bat in the sixth inning, or any inning thereafter if extra innings are necessary. If the home team scores a go-ahead run in the bottom of the sixth or subsequent inning, the game is terminated at that point.

Article 3...If weather or darkness interferes with play so that the game is called (ended) by the Umpire, it is a regulation game: (a) if four full innings have been played, or if the home team has scored an equal or greater number of runs in three and a fraction turns at bat than the visiting team has scored in four turns at bat; or (b) if play has gone beyond four innings. In (b), if the game is called when the teams have not had an equal number of completed turns at bat, the score shall be the same as it was at the end of the last completed inning; except that if the home team has scored a run to tie the score or take the lead in its half of the incomplete inning, the final score shall remain as recorded at the time the game was called.

Article 4...A game called due to exceeding a pre-set time limit is a regulation game: (a) if both teams have completed an equal number of turns at bat; or (b) if the home team has scored a run to tie the score or take the lead at or prior to the expiration of the pre-set time limit. In both (a) and (b), it shall be a regulation game regardless of the number of innings played. If an inning is started before the pre-set time limit has expired that inning will be completed, unless; 1) the visiting team does not tie the score or take the lead in its half of the inning, or 2) the home team scores a go-ahead run before its half of the inning is complete, thus ending the game.

Section 3: Called Game

Article 1...If a game is called before the completion of the number of innings and/or conditions as specified in Sect. 2, Art. 3 and/or 4; the Umpire shall declare the contest “No Game”. A game called for any reason where a winner cannot be determined, or a game called at any time due to mechanical failure (i.e., lack or failure of artificial lights, lack of properly functioning bases or balls, etc.) will be treated as a suspended game. If the game is to be completed at a later time, it will be continued from the point of suspension, with the line-up and batting order of each team the same as it was at the moment of suspension, subject to the rules of the game. If the game is not to be completed, it shall count as ½ game won, ½ game lost for both teams.

Section 4: Forfeited Game

Article 1...A game shall be Forfeited to the offended team by the umpire when a team:

[a] Is twenty minutes late in appearing or in beginning play after the umpire calls “Play” at scheduled game time. This may be set aside if the umpire deems the delay unavoidable; or

[b] Refuses to continue play after the game has begun; or

[c] Delays more than a reasonable amount of time in resuming play, or in obeying the umpire’s order to remove a player, coach, spectator, or other team personnel for violation of the rules; or

[d] Persists in tactics intended to delay or shorten the game; or

[e] Willfully and persistently violates any of the rules after being warned by the umpire, even though a warning is not mandatory; or

[f] Cannot provide six players or the necessary support personnel to complete the game. EXCEPTION: If it is necessary because of illness, injury, or penalty, a team may be allowed to complete a game with five players. An out will be called each time the empty sport in the line-up comes to bate [Rule 3, Sect. 1, Art.1]; or

[g] If a team drops below five players due to ejection, penalty, injury, or the pitcher, catcher, or the last or only spotter is eject and there is no legal replacement; or

[h] On its home field fails or refuses to comply with the umpire’s order to put the field in condition for play.

Article 2...score of a forfeited game is 6 to 0 except if the game is forfeited after the number of innings required for a regulation game and the offending team is behind in the score. Then the score remains as recorded. If the offending team is leading the score is 6 to 0.

Section 5: Protested Game

Article 1...It is optional on the part of a Tournament Committee and officials as to whether protest are permitted. When protest are allowed, they must be submitted in accordance with a prescribed procedure. The Protest Procedure for the National Beep Baseball Association is in Rule 10, Section 4.

RULE 5 DEAD BALL-SUSPENSION OF PLAY

Section 1: Dead Ball

Article 1...Ball becomes Dead immediately when:

[a] a batted ball touches the pitcher or any part of his clothing. If the pitcher makes no effort to avoid being touched by a batted ball umpire may declare batter out, if the umpire determines that the pitcher could not have avoided contact or could not have reacted in time to avoid being touched by the batted ball, he may declare a “no pitch” and batter will resume with ball and strike count as it was before the “no pitch”. If the umpire determines that the pitcher deliberately initiated contact with the batted ball in an effort to cause a call of no pitch, the batter may be declared out; for a repeated occurrence, the pitcher may be ejected; or

[b] The ball is illegally batted or is struck a second time with the bat, or the batter enters the box with an illegal bat (for first occurrence of illegal bat, umpire will issue a team warning, the next occurrence will be an out); or

[c] Any batted ball, while on or over foul ground touches any object other than the ground or any person other than a fielder; or goes directly from the bat to the catcher’s protector, mask, or person without first touching catcher’s glove or hand; or becomes an uncaught foul; or

[d] There is interference by a retired or previous runner; or by any non-fielding person or player; or

[e] a batted ball which is on or over fair ground touches an umpire or other field official, or a spotter, before touching any fielder and before passing any fielder or before passing the forty-foot line; or touches a spectator; or goes over, through, or wedges in a field fence; or

[f] when a pitched or batted ball is intentionally touched by a batter, or nonplaying team member of either team; or goes into a stand or player’s bench; or lodges in an umpire’s equipment or clothing, or a player’s clothing; or

[g] The umpire handles a live ball or calls “Time” for inspecting the ball or for any other reason, including items in Section 2. (If an umpire is hit by a fair ball it is umpire interference, no-pitch); or

[h] A fielder, in the act of fielding or catching a fair or foul ball (including a grounder or fly ball), leaves the field of play by stepping with both feet or by falling into a bench, stand, dugout, bleacher, or over any boundary or barrier such as a fence, rope, chalk line, or a pre-game determined imaginary boundary line; or

[i] An illegal pitch is committed.

Article 2...Ball becomes dead at time of infraction if infraction is not ignored when:

[a] There is interference by a runner; or obstruction by a fielder; or

[b] Any fielder obstructs a batter; or obstructs the ball through use of detached player equipment; or

[c] Umpire or other field official interferes with runner, or fielder; or

[d] Any personnel connected with the defensive team calls “Time” or uses any other command or commits any act for the purpose of trying to distract or disconcert the batter or disrupt the pitcher; or

[e] Any personnel connected with the offensive team calls “Time” or uses any other command or commits any act for the purpose of trying to confuse or disorient any fielder attempting to field the ball.

Article 3...Ball becomes dead when time is taken to make an award after interference, obstruction, or delay.

Article 4...After dead ball, the ball becomes live when it is held by the pitcher in legal position on the pitching mark and the umpire calls “Play” and/or gives hand signal to the pitcher.

Section 2: Suspension of Play

Article 1...”TIME” shall be called by the umpire and play suspended when:

[a] The ball becomes dead; or

[b] The umpire considers the weather, ground, or lighting conditions unfit for play (NOTE: after 30 minute delay, umpire may declare game ended); or

[c] A player, coach, bench personnel, or spectator is ordered from the grounds or player is ordered to secure protective equipment; or repair or replace defective equipment; or

[d] An umpire or player is incapacitated, except that if injury occurs during a live ball, time will not be called until play is over; or

[e] A player or coach requests time and it is granted by the umpire for substitution, conference, or similar cause; or

[f] He suspends play for any other reason including awards following infractions, inspection of the ball, ending the half-inning; or due to outside disturbances which may make it difficult to hear the activated base or the ball (i.e. loud cars, trucks, buses, planes, music, too much noise from the bench, stands, or other cause).

{NOTE: The Head Umpire or Field official are the only persons with authority to call “Time” and suspend play. Any other person desiring “Time” should request it from an official and wait until the Umpire has granted the request before assuming that play has been halted and a “Dead Ball” situation exists.]

Article 2...When the ball becomes dead, no game action can occur, unless ball is dead for awards or penalties.

RULE 6 PITCHING

Section 1: Pitching Regulations

Article 1...The pitcher shall pitch while facing the batter and having at least one foot in contact with the pitching mark at the time he releases the ball. He may receive a verbal signal from the catcher. This signal indicates that the batter is ready and the pitcher shall quickly proceed to pitch.

Article 2...The pitcher is required to give two verbal signals when delivering the ball to the batter. The first signal, “Ready” may be stated at any point, prior to the batter’s swing, during a pitching sequence. At least 1 verbal signal, by either the catcher or pitcher, should be clearly audible to the defense at the start of each pitching sequence.”, These are the only signals considered to be legal, any other words/signals used by the pitcher will result in a no-pitch call.

Article 3...Each legal pitch shall be declared by the umpire to be a strike, pass (ball), foul hit, or dead ball. A pitch dropped during delivery shall be a no pitch. A foul ball shall be called a strike unless it is the fourth strike. A foul tip shall be ruled a foul ball and called a strike unless it is the fourth strike. The fourth strike must be a clean miss.

Article 4...The pitcher is not a fielding position and must make every effort to avoid touching or being touched by a batted ball.

Section 2: Infractions By Pitcher

A Pitcher Shall Not:

Article 1...Deface the ball or deliver a defaced ball. Illegal acts include:

[a] Applying foreign substance to ball or glove; or

[b] Attempt to alter tone of ball; or

[c] attempt to soften ball by bouncing it against the ground or other hard surface; or

[d] Allow a batted ball to touch his person or clothing for purpose of receiving a “no pitch” ruling. If, in umpire’s opinion, pitcher allows batted ball to come in contact, or initiates such contact prior to umpire calling ball dead, umpire may call batter out. Repeated action of this type may result in ejection of offending pitcher.

Article 2...Delay the game. This includes:

[a] Consuming time as the result of the coach or his representative conferring with batter, pitcher, or catcher after having been charged with two offensive charged conferences for that inning; or

[b] Failure to make a pitch, legal or illegal, within 30 seconds after receiving the ready signal from the catcher umpire. NOTE: At the beginning of each half-inning the pitcher may warm up for eight pitchers or two minutes, whichever is less, timed from the moment the third out of the previous halfinning is called. If a pitcher is replaced during an inning, the new pitcher may warm up with no more than eight throws. In either case, the head umpire may authorize more than eight throws because of an injury, inclement weather, or other reason. Umpire shall suspend play and the batter shall remain out of the batter’s box.

Article 3...Since runners do not hold or occupy the bases in Beep Baseball, there is no Balk. However, there is the possibility of an Illegal Pitch. The following acts shall constituted an Illegal Pitch:

[a] Failure to release the ball after the second of two required verbal signals or releasing the ball before the second verbal signal; or

[b] Dropping the ball after beginning the pitching motion, even though accidental; or

[c] Making a pitch from any position other than as required in Rule 6, Sect. 1, Art. 1; or

[d] Failing to pitch to the batter in one continuous motion immediately after giving the first of two required verbal signals; or

[e] Failure to give either of the two required verbal signals, or failure to make either of the signals audible to the defense.

PENALTY for Illegal Pitch: For (b) a no-pitch; for (a), (c), and (d) a strike may be charged to the batter; for (e) on the first occurrence, the head umpire shall warn the pitcher to speak loucer or more clearly, each subsequent infraction may result in a strike being charged to the batter. Penalties will be imposed in precedence over any action by the batter (i.e., regardless of what the batter does, whether a foul ball, miss, hit or pass, that action will be ignored and the result will be a penalty call as set forth above.)

RULE 7 BATTING

Section 1: Position and Batting Order

Article 1...Each player of the team at bat shall become the batter and shall take his position within a batter’s box on either side of home plate, in the order in which his name appears on the line-up card as delivered to the Head Umpire prior to the game. This order shall be followed during the entire game except that an entering substitute shall take the replaced player’s place in the batting order. A batter is in the proper order if he follows the player whose name precedes his in the line-up, even though such preceding batter may have batted out of order. An improper batter is considered to be at bat as soon as he is in the batter’s box and the ball is alive. When improper batter’s infraction is first discovered, time may be requested and improper batter replaced with proper batter with the improper batter’s ball and strike count still in effect, provided the infraction is detected before improper batter is put out, or scores a run.

Article 2...After the first inning, the first batter in each inning shall be the player whose name follows that of the last batter who completed his time at bat in the preceding inning.

PENALTY for Batting Out of Order (Art. 1 & 2):

[a] A batter shall be called out, on appeal, when he fails to bat in his proper turn and another batter completes a time at bat in his place; provided the appeal is made prior to the first pitch, legal or illegal, to the next batter;

[b] When an improper batter scores, is put out, or strikes out, and the defensive team appeals to the Head Umpire before the first pitch, legal or illegal, to the next batter; or before the fielders leave the field if a half-inning is ending, the umpire shall declare the proper batter out and nullify any score made by the improper batter. NOTE: If the improper batter hits and is put out by a fielder, credit for a put out will remain in the defensive player’s record; likewise, if the improper batter strikes out, the pitcher’s record will reflect the strike out, as it would if there had been no batting out of order;

[c] When an improper batter scores or is put out or strikes out and a legal or illegal pitch has been delivered to the next batter or all fielders have left the field ending a half-inning before an appeal is made, the improper batter becomes the proper batter, and the results of his time at bat become legal;

[d] When the proper batter has been called out because he failed to bat in his proper turn, the next batter shall be the batter whose name follows that of the proper batter thus called out; unless an improper batter has been legalized by receiving a pitch, legal or illegal; or through failure of the defensive team to appeal prior to the end of a half-inning or prior to leaving the field;

[e] When an improper batter becomes a proper batter because no appeal is properly made as above, the next batter shall be the batter whose name follows that of such legalized improper batter. The instant an improper batter’s actions are legalized, the batting order picks up with the name following that of the legalized improper batter.

NOTE: When several players bat out of order before the defense appeals, the only out that can occur is the last out of order batter, provided the batter now at the plate has not received a legal or illegal pitch; all previous out of order batters were legalized as soon as the following batter received a legal or illegal pitch.

Section 2: Strikes, Balls and Hits

Article 1...A strike is charged to the Batter when:

[a] A pitch is swung at and missed (even if pitch touches batter); or

0[b] A pitch becomes a foul ball or foul tip when the batter has less than three strikes; or

[c] A batter delays more than thirty (30) seconds in taking a position in a batter’s box on either side of home plate when the pitcher has the ball and the umpire declares “Play”; or

[d] A pitch is not swung at when the batter has taken one pass (ball); or

[e] Batter, pitcher, catcher, or other offensive team personnel charged with infraction for which the penalty is a strike to the batter.

Article 2...A ball is credited to the batter when a pitch is not swung at and the batter has a count of less than one pass (ball). In some cases in these rules, the defensive team may be charged with an infraction that results in a no pitch or a “free pitch” to the batter, this is the equivalent of giving the batter more than four strikes and one pass. Also, there are some cases in which an infraction by the pitcher results in a no pitch. This may seem to be a reward or reprieve to the batter by giving him, in effect, an extra pitch; it is not meant to be so, since the no pitch call has precedence over a score and the batter must resume the plate to complete the turn with ball and strike count as it was prior to the no pitch. If this procedure seems to be unfair to the defense in some cases, it is not intended but is the most reasonable alternative under particular circumstances.

Article 3...A Foul Hit or Fair Hit occurs when a pitch is touched by the bat of the batter who is in the batter’s box.

Section 3: Batting Infractions

A Batter Shall Not:

Article 1...Delay the game by failing to take his position in the batter’s box on either side of home plate within 30 seconds. PENALTY: For failure of batter to be ready within 30 seconds after the ball has been returned to the pitcher, the umpire shall call a strike. If it is the fourth strike, the umpire shall call “Time” and declare the batter out.

NOTE: After entering the batter’s box, the batter leaves it at the risk of being charged with delay. The batter may request “Time” if he desires to step out for a valid reason, and if granted, the 30-second count will be started anew when the ball is declared live. The umpire may refuse to grant “Time” if the batter repeatedly causes delay or if his leaving the box appears to be an attempt to discomfit or discompose the defense or to gain some other advantage.

Article 2...Hit the ball fair or foul while either foot is touching Home Plate (Base). PENALTY: Batter is out.

Article 3...Attempt to disconcert the defense by switching from one side of the plate to the other without requesting and being granted “Time” for this purpose. Since the defense cannot see the batter, and the spotter may be prevented by the rules from alerting the defense to the fact that the batter has switched batting sides, this act constitutes unfair advantage and umpire will not allow it. If a batter wishes to change from one side of the plate to the other he must ask for and receive “Time” before doing so. PENALTY: For failure to request time for the purpose of switching batting sides or switching without permission from the umpire, umpire shall charge batter with strike. If it is the fourth strike, umpire shall call “Time” and declare the batter out.

Article 4...If the bat breaks and contacts the ball a second time or hits the batter/runner or hits a fielder, no interference will be called. If a whole bat is thrown and contacts the ball a second time in fair territory or interferes with a fielder attempting to make a play on the ball, interference will be called. PENALTY: Batter out.

Section 4: Batter Is Out As In Above or When:

[a] Batter enters batter’s box with an illegal bat or is discovered using an illegal bat after the umpire has issued one team warning. If the infraction is discovered before the next pitch, legal or illegal, following the turn at bat of the player who used an illegal bat, the defense may take the penalty or the result of the play; or

[b] He accrues four strikes; or

[c] His fly hit (fair or foul) is caught by a fielder or such catch is prevented by: a spectator, offensive team member (player or non-player), the batter/runner or umpire interference; or by any attempt at verbal or physical intimidation of the defense by any person present; or

[d] Batter attempts to bunt; or

[e] When his/her fair hit ground ball is legally fielded by a defensive player; or

[f] As the result of a penalty.

RULE 8 BASE RUNNING

Section 1: When Batter Becomes a Runner

Article 1...A batter becomes a runner with the right to attempt to score by advancing to the activated base when he hits a fair ball.

Article 2...Runner scores one point for legally advancing to and touching the activated base before his fair hit ball is legally fielded by the defense.

NOTE: In case of a “tie” between the runner and fielder, the runner shall be called out.

Section 2: Touching and Return To A Base

Article 1...An advancing runner shall touch first or third base, whichever is activated at the time the ball is hit.

Article 2...A runner who overruns the activated base may attempt to return to touch it prior to the defense legally fielding his/her hit ball. No verbal or physical assistance may be given by any person to a runner who misses a base and attempts to return to it. PENALTY: Runner is out.

Article 3...For the act of the runner Touching the Base, touching applies to contact of any part of the runner or his/her clothing, if the clothing is reasonably wellfitted, with any part of the base or its wind-resistant device.

Section 3: Base Running Awards

Article 1...When a runner is obstructed while advancing to the activated base by a fielder in direct pursuit of the ball, the umpire shall award a score if the obstruction occurred in foul territory; or an out to the defense if the obstruction occurred in fair territory (interference). If there is doubt as to whether the proper call is obstruction (defense, foul territory) or interference (offense, fair territory), the head umpire may call a replay. If there is interference away from the ball by a defensive player not in direct pursuit of the ball, the umpire may award a run to the offense if the umpire feels that the runner could have touched the activated base prior to the ball being legally fielded had there been no interference. Award may be made whether interference was in fair or foul territory. EXAMPLE: The ball is it to the first base side, third base is activated, the third baseman interferes in foul or fair territory with the runner attempting to reach third base preventing him/her from touching the activated base before the defense legally fields the ball. The umpire may award the run since the third baseman was obviously not in direct pursuit of the ball. Judgement is necessary to assure the runner did not seek the third baseman to instigate the contact and draw the award.

Article 2...When a runner is obstructed by an umpire, or other game official, while advancing to the activated base; or a fielder is prevented from fielding a hit ball by umpire/official interference, the head umpire may award a score to the offense or an out to the defense, or call a replay.

Section 4: Runner Is Out

Article 1...The Batter/Runner is Out When:

[a] His/her fair hit ball is legally fielded (caught) by a fielder before he/she touches the activated base; or

[b] His/her fair or foul fly ball is caught by a fielder before it touches the ground, an umpire or other game official, a spotter, the pitcher or catcher, any object foreign to the natural ground, or any person other than another defensive fielder; or

[c] After hitting the ball, his/her bat again touches the ball in fair territory, or touches the ball before it has passed the forty-foot line when there is a change that the ball could have crossed the line if contact had not been made, the ball is dead and the runner is out. EXCEPTION: If the bat and the ball come in contact a second time while the batter is still holding the bat in the batter’s box, it is a foul ball; or

[d] Runner is out when he is touched by or touches a fair hit ball before the ball is touched by a fielder, unless such touching occurs while the batter is still in the batter’s box (foul ball); or

[e] He/she touches or is touched by his/her hit ball which is rolling toward first or third base, inside the base line, before the ball has crossed the forty-foot line and there is a possibility that the ball could have crossed the line fi the runner had not had contact with the ball; or

[f] There is interference with a fielder by any person associated with the offensive team.

RULE 9 SCORING AND RECORD-KEEPING

    TEXT TO BE PROVIDED AT A LATER DATE

RULE 10 UMPIRING

Section 1: General

Article 1...Game officials are the Head Umpire and one or two field umpires. Any umpire has the authority to order a player, coach, team attendant, spectator, or other person to do or refrain from doing anything that affects the administration of these rules, or the conduct of the game, and to enforce prescribed penalties. Other game officials may include the official scorekeeper, base operator (optional), and base judges. If there is not a person available to keep score who is unconnected with either of the teams playing, the official scorekeeper will be the scorekeeper for the home team.

Article 2...If there is only one umpire, he/she has complete jurisdiction in administering the rules and may take any position he/she desires on the field.

Article 3...Any umpire’s decision which involves judgment, such as whether a hit is fair or foul, ball is legally fielded, or whether base is touched prior to legal fielding of ball, etc... is final. If there is reasonable doubt about some decision being in conflict with the rules, the coach or captain may ask that the correct ruling be made. The umpire making the decision may ask another umpire or official for information before making a final decision. No umpire shall criticize or interfere with another umpire’s decision, on or off the field, unless asked by the one making it.

Article 4...No umpire may be replaced during a game unless he/she becomes ill or is injured. His/her right to disqualify players or to remove non-players for unwarranted objection to decisions or for unsportsmanlike conduct is absolute.

Section 2: Head Umpire

Article 1...If there are two or more umpires, the Head Umpire shall stand in the vicinity of home plate. He/she shall call and count passes (balls) and strikes, signal fair hits, and call out “Foul Ball” while signaling a foul hit, he/she shall make all decisions on the batter/runner (i.e. safe, out, replay, dead ball, interference, obstruction, malfunctioning equipment, etc.).

Article 2...The Head Umpire has authority to suspend a game and/or recommend forfeiture in tournament play, he/she may forfeit a game in non-tournament play, and he/she has jurisdiction over any rules matters not mentioned in Rule 10, Sect. 2, Art.1, and not assigned to the field umpire in Rule 10, Sect. 3.

NOTE: The Umpire’s jurisdiction begins with the pre-game conference.

Article 3...The duties of the Head Umpire are those listed in Rule 10, Sect. 2, Art. 1, 2 and the following:

[a] Inspect equipment, condition of field, receive batting order of both teams, announce special ground rules and formulate such if the two teams cannot agree, designate the official scorer and see that each player takes his/her glove and other loose equipment to the bench at the end of his/her term in the field; and

[b] The Head Umpire will allow each batter to hear the bases one at a time on that batter’s first urn at bat in each inning. Subsequent request by the same batter to hear the bases sounded will be allowed for valid reason; and

[c] Call “Play” and give hand signal to start the game or to resume play; and call “Time” whenever ball becomes dead; and

[d] Eject a player, coach, spotter or clear the bench or send coach or any other person from the field or spectator area if it becomes necessary; and

[e] Announce each substitution to the official scorekeeper; and

[f] Call or suspend game if conditions become unfit for play; and

[g] Penalize for rule infraction s(i.e. interference, obstruction, delay, unsportsmanlike conduct, unwarranted disputing of decision, etc.); and

[h] Make final decision on points not specifically covered by the rules; and

[i] Forfeit or recommend forfeit of the game for proscribed infractions by spectators, coaches, players, spotters, or attendants; and

[j] When protest are allowed, he/she shall report the protest to the proper person(s) along with all related conditions at the time of the protested play, provided the protest is entered by the offended team at the time of the play and before the next pitch, legal or illegal, after such play, or before both teams leave the field if the play in question is the last play of the game (see Section 4); and

[k] Keep a written record of defensive team charged conferences for each team and notify the respective coach each time a conference is charged to his/her team. He/she shall also be responsible for keeping a line-up card for each team and recording all substitutions; and

[l] Not allow a player who has been rendered unconscious or sustained a serious head injury or suspected broken bone or dislocation to resume playing without written authorization from a physician.

Section 3: Field Umpire

Article 1...A Field Umpire may assist the Head Umpire in administering the rules. He/she shall make all decisions in the field except those reserved for the Head Umpire. He/she shall have concurrent jurisdiction with the Head Umpire in calling time, attempt to alter tone of ball by pitcher, use of illegal pitch, caught fly ball, legal catch, double call by spotter(s) or in ejecting any coach, player, spotter, spectator or other person for flagrant, unsportsmanlike conduct or other infraction as proscribed by the rules. In some instances he/she will rule on the ball being fair or foul.

Article 2...When there is only one Field Umpire, he shall make all decisions in the field as set forth in Article 1 and any other decisions delegated to him by the Head Umpire.

Article 3...When more than one Field Umpire is used, they will position themselves so as to provide the best coverage of the field. They will have concurrent jurisdiction with the first Field Umpire.

Article 4...When there are only two officials, one shall be the Head Umpire and the other shall be designated Field Umpire. The Field Umpire shall rule on the legality of a “catch” by calling “Caught” when the ball has been legally fielded. The Head Umpire shall watch the runner for obstruction, interference, and legal touch at the base, he/she shall call “There” when he observes a legal touch. The final decision of safe, out, replay, or penalty belongs to the Head Umpire.

Article 5...If there are three or more officials, one shall be designated Head Umpire, and shall assign the others as follows: Two will be Field Umpires and will call the field and bases. The Field Umpire at the activated base will rule on a legal touch by the runner by calling “There” when he has observed a legal touch. The second Field Umpire will rule on the catch, calling “Caught” when he/she observes a legal catch. The Head Umpire will make the final decision of safe, out, replay, or penalty. Other personnel may be assigned as the Head Umpire sees fit.

Article 6...The Head Umpire of a field may confer with other officials present on that field at any time to acquire information prior to making a decision on a play or other situation.

Section 4: Protest Procedure

At the request of the NBBA Board of Directors, the following formal procedure was developed for use in NBBA sanctioned Beep Baseball play:

[a] The coach or captain of the offended team must request “Time” to discuss the situation with the Head Umpire of the field before the first pitch, legal or illegal, to the next batter. The Umpire will not refuse to grant such time out for this purpose, nor will an offensive or defensive conference be charged; and

[b] after being granted time out, the coach or captain of the offended team must inform the Head Umpire of the game that a protest will be filed concerning the previous play; and

[c] The Head Umpire will inform the official scorekeeper and note in the score book or on the scoresheet, the facts of the protest and the game situation existing immediately prior to the protest; and

[d] Both coaches and captains, the Head Umpire of the game, the Field Umpire (if there is one), the Official Scorekeeper, and the scorekeepers for both teams will sign the scoresheet; and

[e] The game will resume and continue to it’s conclusion or to the next protest; and

[f] Immediately following the game, the coach and/or captain of the protesting team will prepare a full written or dictated report of the protested play, giving the game situation existing prior to the play, details of the play, and reason for protest, citing any rules references believed to apply (judgment decisions can not be protested). This report should contain as much detail as necessary to clearly convey the situation to another person not on the scene. The report must be presented to the head of the Tournament Committee or a person designated by the Tournament Committee or the NBBA to hear protest before the next game in which the protesting team will participate; and

[g] The Head Umpire and the Field Umpire for the game will also prepare and present written reports of the protested play before the next game in which the protesting team will participate; and

[h] The person designated to hear protests should not be a coach, captain, or player for any team participating in the game, series, or tournament. The designated person will select at least two, but not more than three, additional persons to sit as a protest committee to hear the protest. At least one of these persons much be a coach or player and at least one person must be an Umpire and none of them may have any connection with either team or specific interest in the outcome of the protest game; and

[i] The Protested Committee will read the reports and issue a ruling within 24 hours of the time the first report was received. In the process of making a decision, either team’s score book, the official Score book, and personal interview with nay reliable witness, team member, coach, and/or Umpire or other official may be used, unsolicited testimony will be ignored; and

[j] If the protest is upheld, the game will be resumed at the point of the protested play with the game situation exactly as it was immediately prior to the protested play and will be played to its conclusion as if the protested play had not occurred. The Official Game Record will be that of the resumed game and all previous records from the protested play to the end of the game will be erased; and

[k] If the protest is denied, the Official Record will be that of the protested game; and

[l] There is no protest of an Umpire’s judgment, only rule applications may be protested; and

[m] It is suggested that a protest fee of not less than twenty-five dollars nor more than fifty dollars be assessed with each protest filed. Only one play may be protest per report. The protest fee is to be paid in cash by the protesting team at the time the protest report is filed. If the protest is upheld, all or part of the fee may be returned; if the protest is denied, the entire fee is forfeited to the Tournament Fund or the NBBA general fund. A low fee or o fee may encourage frivolous protests; and

[n] If a protest is upheld and a game is to be replayed from the point of protest, the line-up of both teams will be the same as listed on the Official Scoresheet for the protested game at the time of the protested play. The Head Umpire and the Field Umpire should also be the same.

 
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